Just Released: Ohio Unemployment rate July ’11 (State County Map)

Ohio and U.S. Employment Situation (Seasonally Adjusted)

Ohio’s unemployment rate was 9.0 percent in July, up slightly from 8.8
percent in June, according to data released this morning by the Ohio Department
of Job and Family Services (ODJFS). Ohio’s nonfarm wage and salary employment
increased 6,500 over the month, from the revised 5,106,900 in June to 5,113,400
in July.

The number of workers unemployed in Ohio in July was 529,000, up from 517,000
in June. The number of unemployed has decreased by 60,000 in the past 12 months
from 589,000. The July unemployment rate for Ohio was down from 10.0 percent in
July 2010.

The U.S. unemployment rate for July was 9.1 percent, about unchanged from 9.2
percent in June.

Total Nonagricultural Wage and Salary Employment (Seasonally
Adjusted)

Ohio’s nonfarm payroll employment increased 6,500 over the
month, from 5,106,900 in June to 5,113,400 in July, according to the latest
business establishment survey conducted by ODJFS.

Goods-producing industries, at 821,200, were up 9,100 from June, driven by an
increase in manufacturing (+7,900) and slight improvements in construction
(+1,100) and mining and logging (+100). Service-providing industries decreased
2,600 over the month to 4,292,200. The most significant losses occurred in
leisure and hospitality (-6,500) and educational and health services (-2,900).
Other industries losing jobs included trade, transportation, and utilities
(-500), and government (-400). Professional and business services (+6,000),
financial activities (+1,000), other services (+500), and information (+200)
experienced over-the-month gains.

Over the past 12 months, nonagricultural wage and salary employment advanced
74,100. Service-providing industries added 55,800 jobs. The most significant
gains occurred in educational and health services (+25,000), professional and
business services (+20,000), and leisure and hospitality (+11,300). Trade,
transportation, and utilities (+5,700), other services (+4,400), and financial
activities (+1,800) also experienced growth. Government declined 11,900 and
information lost 500 jobs. Goods-producing industries increased 18,300 over the
year. Manufacturing added 11,900 jobs, as a gain in durable goods (+15,800)
exceeded a loss in nondurable goods (-3,900). Construction (+5,900) and mining
and logging (+500) also increased from July 2010.

EDITOR’S NOTE: All data cited are produced in cooperation with the U. S.
Department of Labor. Data sources include Current Population Survey (U.S. data);
Current Employment Statistics Program (nonagricultural wage and salary
employment data); and Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program (Ohio
unemployment rates). More complete listings of the data appear in the monthly
Ohio Labor Market Review. Unemployment rates for all Ohio counties
as well as cities with populations of 50,000 or more are presented in the
monthly ODJFS Civilian Labor Force Estimates publication. Updated
statewide historical data may be obtained by contacting the Bureau of Labor
Market Information at (614)
752-9494 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting              (614)
752-9494     end_of_the_skype_highlighting. Ohioans can
access tens of thousands of job openings, for positions ranging from file clerks
to CEOs, at www.ohiomeansjobs.com.

News
release dates

A calendar of 2011 release dates is available online at http://OhioLMI.com/laus/releases.htm.
County, city and metropolitan area unemployment rates for July 2011 will be
posted online at http://OhioLMI.com/laus/current.htm
on Tuesday, August 23, 2011. August 2011 unemployment rates and nonagricultural
wage and salary data for Ohio will be released by ODJFS on Friday, September 16,
2011. This information and the monthly statistical summaries it is based on are
also available at http://jfs.ohio.gov/releases.

Choose this link to view the table on the Ohio and U.S.
Employment Situation
.

Choose this link to view the table for the Nonagricultural Wage and Salary
Employment Estimates for Ohio
.

 

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Published in: on August 26, 2011 at 05:07  Leave a Comment  
Tags:

Unemployment Rate: Ohio by county map (Dec 2010)

Unemployment Rates
Area Dec’10 Nov’10 Dec’09
Ohio 9.6% 9.8% 10.8%
Ohio not seasonally adjusted 9.3% 9.3% 10.7%
U.S. 9.4% 9.8% 9.9%
U.S. not seasonally adjusted 9.1% 9.3% 9.7%

Click image to enlarge

Unemployment Rate Update County Map (Ohio November 2010)

Click to enlarge

Unemployment Rates
Area Nov’10 Oct’10 Nov’09
Ohio 9.8% 9.9% 10.8%
Ohio not seasonally adjusted 9.3% 9.5% 10.3%
U.S. 9.8% 9.6% 10.0%
U.S. not seasonally adjusted 9.3% 9.0% 9.4%

Ohio County Map: Unemployment rate Map September 2010

Unemployment may by county sept 10

Ohio Unemployment Rate Data: September 2010

Unemployment Rates
Area Sep’10 Aug’10 Sep’09
Ohio 10.0% 10.1% 10.7%
Ohio not seasonally adjusted 9.6% 9.7% 10.2%
U.S. 9.6% 9.6% 9.8%
U.S. not seasonally adjusted 9.2% 9.5% 9.5%

 

Ohio and U.S. Employment Situation (Seasonally Adjusted)

Ohio’s unemployment rate was 10.0 percent in September, down from 10.1 percent in August, according to data released this morning by the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS). Ohio’s nonfarm wage and salary employment decreased 17,300 over the month, from the revised 5,031,500 in August to 5,014,200 in September.

“While Ohio’s employment situation was largely unchanged in September, an increase in education and healthcare hiring helped drive the unemployment rate down for the sixth consecutive month,” ODJFS Director Douglas Lumpkin said.

The number of workers unemployed in Ohio in September was 591,000, down from 601,000 in August. The number of unemployed has decreased by 47,000 in the past 12 months from 638,000. The September unemployment rate for Ohio was down from 10.7 percent in September 2009.

The U.S. unemployment rate for September was 9.6 percent, unchanged from August.

Total Nonagricultural Wage and Salary Employment (Seasonally Adjusted)
Ohio’s nonfarm payroll employment fell 17,300 over the month, from 5,031,500 in August to 5,014,200 in September, according to the latest business establishment survey conducted by ODJFS.

Service-providing industries, at 4,213,100, were down 9,700 from August. The largest decline occurred in government (-9,500). Also down were other services (-1,300), leisure and hospitality (-1,100), information (-1,000), professional and business services (-700), trade, transportation, and utilities (-600), and financial activities (-300). Educational and health services rose 4,800. Goods-producing industries dropped 7,600 to 801,100. Construction declined 4,400. Decreases in nondurable goods (-2,700) and durable goods (-600) lowered manufacturing 3,300. Mining and logging increased 100.

Over the past 12 months, nonagricultural wage and salary employment declined 600. Service-providing industries lost 5,400 jobs. The most significant losses occurred in government (-15,200) and financial activities (-12,700). Also down were information (-4,900), other services (-2,500), and trade, transportation, and utilities (-500). Notable gains were posted in professional and business services (+16,900), educational and health services (+8,700), and leisure and hospitality (+4,800). Goods-producing industries advanced 4,800 from September 2009. Manufacturing increased 8,200 as a gain in durable goods (+12,800) more than offset a reduction in nondurable goods (-4,600). Mining and logging was up 100. Construction lost 3,500 jobs.

– 30 -EDITOR’S NOTE: All data cited are produced in cooperation with the U. S. Department of Labor. Data sources include Current Population Survey (U.S. data); Current Employment Statistics Program (nonagricultural wage and salary employment data); and Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program (Ohio unemployment rates). More complete listings of the data appear in the monthly Ohio Labor Market Review. Unemployment rates for all Ohio counties as well as cities with populations of 50,000 or more are presented in the monthly ODJFS Civilian Labor Force Estimates publication. Updated statewide historical data may be obtained by contacting the Bureau of Labor Market Information at (614) 752-9494 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting              (614) 752-9494      end_of_the_skype_highlighting. Ohioans can access tens of thousands of job openings, for positions ranging from file clerks to CEOs, at www.ohiomeansjobs.com.News release datesA calendar of 2010 release dates is available online at http://OhioLMI.com/laus/releases.htm County, city and metropolitan area unemployment rates for September 2010 will be posted online at http://OhioLMI.com/laus/current.htm on Tuesday, October 26, 2010. October 2010 unemployment rates and nonagricultural wage and salary data for Ohio will be released by ODJFS on Friday, November 19, 2010. This information and the monthly statistical summaries it is based on are also available at http://jfs.ohio.gov/releases.Choose this link to view the table on the Ohio and U.S. Employment Situation.

Choose this link to view the table for the Nonagricultural Wage and Salary Employment Estimates for Ohio.

Unemployement Rate Update Ohio (Aug 2010)

Ohio and U.S. Employment Situation (Seasonally Adjusted)

Ohio’s unemployment rate was 10.1 percent in August, down slightly from 10.3 percent in July, according to data released this morning by the Ohio Department of Job and Family Services (ODJFS). Ohio’s nonfarm wage and salary employment decreased 15,400 over the month, from the revised 5,046,600 in July to 5,031,200 in August.

“Ohio’s unemployment rate decreased for the fifth consecutive month.” ODJFS Director Douglas Lumpkin said. “We are cautiously optimistic that Ohio’s job market will continue to improve.”

The number of workers unemployed in Ohio in August was 601,000, down from 614,000 in July. The number of unemployed has decreased by 37,000 in the past 12 months from 638,000. The August unemployment rate for Ohio was down from 10.7 percent in August 2009.

The U.S. unemployment rate for August was 9.6 percent, about unchanged from 9.5 percent in July.

Total Nonagricultural Wage and Salary Employment (Seasonally Adjusted)

Ohio’s nonfarm payroll employment fell 15,400 over the month, from 5,046,600 in July to 5,031,200 in August according to the latest business establishment survey conducted by ODJFS.

Service-providing employment dropped 9,100 to 4,222,700. The largest decrease was posted in professional and business services (-8,800). Also down were government (-5,000), financial activities (-3,200), and educational and health services (-900). Employment increased over the month in trade, transportation, and utilities (+5,900), leisure and hospitality (+1,500), other services (+1,300), and information (+100). Goods-producing industries, at 808,500, declined 6,300 from July. Losses in nondurable goods (-4,000) and durable goods (-1,100) reduced the workforce in manufacturing 5,100. Construction lost 1,200 jobs. Mining and logging was little changed.

Over the past 12 months, nonagricultural wage and salary employment advanced 7,300. Goods-producing employment increased 8,400. Manufacturing added 10,400 jobs as higher employment in durable goods (+11,900) exceeded a reduction in nondurable goods (-1,500). Construction decreased 2,000. Mining and logging was unchanged. Service-providing industries declined 1,100 from August 2009. Sectors with lower employment were financial activities (-13,000), government ( 6,500), information (-4,100), trade, transportation, and utilities (-2,400), and other services (-1,700). Employment was up in professional and business services (+15,200), leisure and hospitality (+9,000), and educational and health services (+2,400).

– 30 –

EDITOR’S NOTE: All data cited are produced in cooperation with the U. S. Department of Labor. Data sources include Current Population Survey (U.S. data); Current Employment Statistics Program (nonagricultural wage and salary employment data); and Local Area Unemployment Statistics Program (Ohio unemployment rates). More complete listings of the data appear in the monthly Ohio Labor Market Review. Unemployment rates for all Ohio counties as well as cities with populations of 50,000 or more are presented in the monthly ODJFS Civilian Labor Force Estimates publication. Updated statewide historical data may be obtained by contacting the Bureau of Labor Market Information at (614) 752-9494 begin_of_the_skype_highlighting              (614) 752-9494      end_of_the_skype_highlighting. Ohioans can access tens of thousands of job openings, for positions ranging from file clerks to CEOs, at www.ohiomeansjobs.com.

News release dates

A calendar of 2010 release dates is available online at http://OhioLMI.com/laus/releases.htm County, city and metropolitan area unemployment rates for August 2010 will be posted online at http://OhioLMI.com/laus/current.htm on Tuesday, September 21, 2010. September 2010 unemployment rates and nonagricultural wage and salary data for Ohio will be released by ODJFS on Friday, October 22, 2010. This information and the monthly statistical summaries it is based on are also available at http://jfs.ohio.gov/releases.

Choose this link to view the table on the Ohio and U.S. Employment Situation.

Choose this link to view the table for the Nonagricultural Wage and Salary Employment Estimates for Ohio.

Published in: on September 23, 2010 at 07:34  Leave a Comment  
Tags:

National Economic Update Mid-July 2010

Weekly Economic Summary – July 9, 2010

OVERVIEW ~ June 28 through July 2 ~ The psychology of the economic marketplace, to the extent that it can be measured, shows up in the numbers. Over the course of the week, for example, the Dow Jones Industrial Average (DJIA) fell from 10143.81 at the opening on Monday to 9640.69, presumably on growing concerns about the apparent weakness in the American economy. Until recently, it has generally been agreed that the economy would stumble forward for several months and then, at the beginning of the next year, begin to grow in a sustainable way. By Friday, however, after the release of the June employment figures, the DJIA dropped and most other data edged lower. Even the manufacturing sector, which has been one of the brightest lights in the economy in recent months, showed a weakening with the Institute of Supply Management (ISM) Index dropping from a strong 59.7 in April to 56.2 in May, and a 1.4% fall for May factory orders. In such an environment, interest rates are likely to fall, and indeed the 10-year Treasury note declined from 3.110% to 2.956%.

FOCUS ~ The employment report was treated as if it were a mid-term report card for the economy in our nation. The Thursday report of 472,000 new claims for unemployment insurance worried most investors and then the larger employment report, released Friday, caused analysts to doubt their earlier hopes for recovery and caused the markets to fall significantly.

There were 125,000 jobs lost in June. Analysts had hoped for a furthering of the positive numbers reported in the prior month. We need at least 150,000 new jobs each month to just keep up with the employment needs in our nation. In June, the economy failed even to tread water.

The unemployment rate actually declined from 9.7% to 9.5%, but this was not good news either, because the survey indicated that 652,000 capable workers had simply stopped looking for work, pulling themselves out of the so-called “labor pool.” Thus, the unemployment rate declined, not because more people found jobs, but because fewer people are looking for them.

The May employment report apparently lulled investors and analysts into a more optimistic view than it should have, largely because of the many census jobs that increased employment numbers and then swiftly fell away. A survey of American economists had resulted in a median expectation of 110,000 new jobs in June. Thus, the markets reacted strongly to the decline.

If there is any good news to be found in the week, it is the fact that overall mortgage interest rates remain even more attractive than they were before.

Ohio Unemployement Rate Map by County May 2010 Just released

Ohio’s Unemployement Rate Update May 2010 just released

Ohio State data Unemployment map by County Jan ’10

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